Progress towards closing social and economic gaps between Māori and non-Māori
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Progress towards closing social and economic gaps between Māori and non-Māori a report to the Minister of Māori Affairs.

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Published by Te Puni Kōkiri (Ministry of Māori Development) in Wellington, N.Z .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • New Zealand

Subjects:

  • Maori (New Zealand people) -- Economic conditions -- Statistics.,
  • Maori (New Zealand people) -- Social conditions -- Statistics.,
  • New Zealand -- Population -- Statistics.

Book details:

Edition Notes

GenreStatistics.
ContributionsNew Zealand. Ministry of Maori Development.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDU423.E3 P76 2000
The Physical Object
Pagination53 p. :
Number of Pages53
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6856063M
ISBN 100478091796
LC Control Number00364644
OCLC/WorldCa45128445

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Progress towards closing social and economic gaps between Māori and non-Māori: a report to the Minister of Māori Affairs.. [New Zealand. Te Puni Kōkiri.;] -- "This second report in the Closing the Gaps series presents the current picture of the status of Maori"--Page second Closing the gaps report has been structured to provide information on. Progress towards closing social and economic gaps between Maori and non-Maori: a report to the Minister of Maori Affairs. Progress Towards Closing Social and Economic Gaps between Maori and Non-Maori presents data collected by state sector agencies and is the first report of its kind in NZ. Over the past decade, Maori participation in the work force has been drastically reduced. 32 Socio-Economic Gaps between Mäori and Mäori has the further advantage of facilitating comparison of between-iwi and between-ethnic groups disparities.3 table 1 shows the ranking of the iwi on each of the eight characteristics (columns 1 to 8). the definitions of the headings for tables 1, 3 and 4.

Ministry of Maori Development (), Progress Towards Closing Social and Economic Gaps Between Maori and non-Maori, Te Puni Kokiri (Ministry of Maori Development), Wellington. Rosenthal, Robert and Rubin Donald B. (), “A note on the percent variance explained as a measure of the importance of effects”, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, The May i progress report on the Closing the Gaps initiative demonstrates that Maori continue to experience poorer health status, lower income levels, higher unemployment, higher prosecution and conviction rates, lower standards of living and lower rates of home ownership, and lower educational status than non-Maori. A gaps analysis such as that in the report on Progress Towards Closing Social and Economic Gaps Between Mäori and non-Mäori (Te Puni Kökiri May b) focuses on individual performance, giving an important, but only partial, interpretation of Mäori circumstances (JHMRC ). Gaps analysis in these terms could be considered as. An exploration from a western academic perspective of the meaning of the term "economic development" and what the process may encompass enabled the following generic definition of the term to be constructed: Economic development is a change process initiated by a value judgement that the current state of a community is not as desirable as a.

If New Zealand's economy continues to fail Maori then the inability of Maori to reach acceptable levels of "well being" will begin to affect the "well being" of non-Maori, as New Zealand's government through social policies struggles to close the gap between Maori and non-Maori. The objective of this study was to investigate the process of. () publication Progress Towards Closing Social and Economic Gaps Between Maori and Non-Maori. Overarching goals and strategic priorities: The Government has seven overarching goals and ten strategic priorities which indicate the Government’s strategic direction from to and provide the broad parameters for specific policy making. of closing gaps between the European population and Pacific people. Again not all of the decreases in gaps are significant. Worsening differences were found in 11 (65 per cent) of the indicators measuring inequality between the European population and Pacific people. Similarly to the Māori population, one indicator remained unchanged. Background • Persistent health inequalities between Maori and non- Maori highlighted by recent “Progress Towards Closing the Social And Economic Gaps” and “Social Inequalities in Health” publications • Claim that inequalities reflect socio-economic inequality and that this is decreasing (Chapple; Prebble et al ).